Documentation

Installing

You can install Check Sheet for free from the Google Workspace Marketplace. Once you’ve done this Check Sheet will be available for use within all your Google Sheets, you can access it from the Add-ons menu.

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Getting Started

To create a check you need to open Check Sheet from the Add-ons menu within one of your sheets, hover over Check Sheet in the drop down and click “Settings”.

You should then see the Check Sheet welcome screen pop up which will prompt you to create your first check. Click the “Add Check” button to create your first check.

Concepts

The following concepts are key to understanding Check Sheet and how to make the best use of it.

Checks

The key concept in Check Sheet is a “check”, you can create many checks and these checks will be evaluated in the following scenarios:

A check can be in one of two states, matched or unmatched. Whether a check matches is determined based on the conditions you have defined for that check.

If a check is matched this may trigger a notification being sent depending on ___.

Conditions

You can create checks on your spreadsheet based on a variety of conditions. The conditions you can use depends upon the type of data that you are checking.

Numbers

For cell(s) containing numbers you can define checks to see if they are:

Text

For cell(s) containing text you can define checks to see if they are:

Dates

For cell(s) contains dates you can define checks to see if they are:

Values

The value(s) that your check condition is evaluated against can be one of three types as listed below.

It’s important to note that when evaluating your checks we use the raw value from the spreadsheet, without any formatting applied. For example if you have a cell with a price in that you have formatted as a currency when entering the value you should not include this formatting, just the raw numeric value.

Text

Any piece of text.

Number

Any integer or decimal.

Range

A reference to a a single cell or range of cells using A1 notation that is prefixed with an equals sign.

Creating a Check

To create your first check open Check Sheet as described in Getting Started or if you’ve already created a check you’ll see a green “Add” button at the top of your list of checks.

You’ll then be presented with a blank form as shown below that allows you to enter the details of your check.

A check is made up of the following properties:

Editing a Check

To edit a check open the Check Sheet settings and you should see a list of your checks. Click the yellow “Edit” button on the check you want to edit and the check details will appear.

Deleting a Check

To delete a check open the Check Sheet settings and you should see a list of your checks. Click the yellow “Edit” button on the check you want to delete and then the red “Delete” button in the bottom right of the screen.

Notifications

If your check matches you can send a notification to any of the following systems.

If you are checking a range of cells you can choose whether to receive a notification just the first time a check matches or each time. For example if you had a column with stock statuses you could either receive a notification just the first time a value goes from “In Stock” to “Out of Stock” or each time that occurs.

Email

You can send a notification to one or multiple email addresses, it will contain a list of all the checks that were matched.

Slack

Notifications can be sent to a Slack channel via their simple and free to install Incoming Webhooks app. You can follow this guide to set up your webhook then you just need to copy the URL that Slack gives you into your Check. It should look something like: https://hooks.slack.com/services/…

Teams

Notifications can be sent to a Microsoft Teams channel via their simple and free to install Incoming Webhooks connector. You can follow this guide to set up your webhook then you just need to copy the URL that Microsoft gives you into your Check. It should look something like: https://outlook.office.com/webhook/…

Examples

Checking a single cell

You can check a single cell by specifying it in the range field using using A1 notation like so: B12.

In the example below we check if we are breaking even by checking if the value in cell A10 is greater than or equal to 0.

Checking multiple cells

You can check multiple cells by specifying a range of cells in the range field using A1 notation like so: A1:A10.

You can then choose if you want your check to evaluate if “Any” of the values in the range match, “All” of the values match or “None” of the values match.

In the example below we check if all of the values in the range C2:C15 are equal to “Done”.

Checking multiple cells against multiple values

You can check multiple cells against multiple values by specifying a range of cells in both the range and value fields using A1 notation like so: A1:A10. In the value field the range needs to be prefixed with an equals sign like so: =A1:A10.

You can then choose if you want your check to evaluate if “Any” of the values in the range match, “All” of the values match or “None” of the values match.

The cells you specify in the range will be matched against their corresponding cell in the value. Lets take the example data below where we might want to check that each member of the sales team had met their assigned target.

To do this we could set the range for our check to C2:C5 and the value to B2:B5 so that we are comparing their sales figures against their targets.

Checking a column

As an extension of checking multiple cells you can check an entire column by specifying the range using A1 notation like so: A:A.

In the example below we check if any of the values in the column B that contains sales are greater than 100.

Checking a row

As an extension of checking multiple cells you can check an entire row by specifying the range using A1 notation like so: 1:1.

In the example below we check if any of the values in the 2nd row, a record of the daily traffic to our website, are greater than 100.

Pricing

You can install and use Check Sheet for free but with certain limits applied. To increase these limits you can upgrade to one of our paid plans. You can view the pricing and upgrade from within the add-on.

Limits

The following limits apply to your usage of Check Sheet. We reserve the right to change these at any time but will do our best to give you notice of any changes that might affect your usage of Check Sheet.

Spreadsheets

You can use Check Sheet in as many spreadsheets as you like.

Checks

You can create as many checks as you like as well.

Notifications

The only limitation we set is on the number of notifications you send each month as there is a cost for sending them.

At present there is a limit of 500 notifications that can be sent per month on our free plan. If you wish to send more than this you will need to upgrade to one of our paid plans.

Your limits will reset monthly, any remaining allowance will not rollover.

Known Issues

Below are some known issues with Check Sheet, if you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact us.

The add-on doesn’t work when I’m signed into multiple Google accounts

Due to a long standing bug with Google’s authentication system you cannot use the add-on when you are signed into multiple Google accounts. The only options to avoid this are either signing out from your other accounts or using the add-on in another browser or private/incognito mode. Until Google resolves this issue on their side this is unfortunately out of our hands.

Updates made via other add-ons, bots or API calls are delayed

Due to a limitation in how we get the data from your spreadsheet, updates that are made via other add-ons or the Google Sheets API are not picked up in real-time. They will be either be seen the next time an update is made via a person, form submission or when we evaluate all checks approximately once per hour. We are looking into ways to improve upon this.